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Balazs Nagy's Profile

GitHub User: julian7

Site: http://blog.js.hu/

Comments by Balazs Nagy

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My latest revision of reading yaml'ed data in application.rb (1.9 notation):

ruby
read_yaml = ->(fname) do
  begin
    YAML.load(File.read(File.expand_path("../#{fname}", __FILE__)))
  rescue Errno::ENOENT
    {}
  end
end

appconfig = read_yaml.('application.yml')
defaults = read_yaml.('application_defaults.yml')
CONFIG = defaults.deep_merge(appconfig)
CONFIG.merge! CONFIG.fetch(Rails.env, {})
CONFIG.symbolize_keys!

One less mutation, and it allows specifying environment-dependent settings in both yaml files. It does use mutation though, but as far as I know they (merge! and symbolize_keys!) are both thread-safe.

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It has been extracted to transitions gem, even before rails 3 came out.

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Asset precompile can hinder zero downtime too, however it's relatively easy to fix too, if you use nginx:

nginx
  location ~ ^/assets/  {
    gzip_static on;
    try $uri /old$uri;
    expires max;
    add_header  Cache-Control public;
  }

and if you've done generating your public/assets, throw away public/oldassets, and move public/assets to its place!

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According to a pull request, it looks like 4.0 will accept arrays in permit() params as hash values too, therefore in the example, you can write this:

ruby
class PermittedParams
  ...
  def topic_attributes
    [:name].tap do |attributes|
      attributes << :sticky if user && user.admin?
      attributes << {posts_attributes: [:post, :attributes]}
    end
  end
  ...
end
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It doesn't override the files themselves, but those will be used as defaults. All of your locale data will go into copycopter database. You can remove your original files then, and/or you even replace them with a version extracted from the current copycopter database. This means by time you can even shut down your copycopter server.

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Because you won't be able to use minitest's advanced features if you stick with test/unit.

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Yep, ruby1.9 implements test/unit using minitest.

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That's awesome. You figure out a lot of things I'm just lazy to dig out. I'm sure this ep will encourage people to use MiniTest in their projects.

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That's true, cd doesn't handle autocompletion in cdpaths.

Anyways, I use omz for looking up interesting solutions. I like to keep my shell environment small.

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To use the proper settings. Maybe rake command starts the wrong version of ruby. Maybe it sets up a wrong configuration... it is written nicely already: http://yehudakatz.com/2011/05/30/gem-versioning-and-bundler-doing-it-right/

Sure, you don't have to use bundle exec. In this case, however, you have to use binstubs, and you have to run commands from there.

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I'm thinking on a viable solution for this since David's starting keynote. This =depend_on is a good idea, but having two separate lists (one for @import and another for depend_on) is not.

However, we can do it in a different way.

We can put any variable declarations, mixins, functions to a separate file we can depend on, then we can @import them in every single .scss file, and then we can use =require_tree . in application.css.

Rules of thumb:

  • As Ryan mentioned, .scss files get rendered separately, therefore separating declarations from actual @includes doesn't work in sprockets natively.
  • We can @import declarations to every single .scss file.
  • However, while =require'd files can come either from app/assets, lib/assets, and vendor/assets, @import doesn't know the trick. It doesn't even know about Sprocket's require magic (using wildcards, requiring trees, maintaining depends).
  • =require_tree load sequence is defined by the operating system, therefore we can't rely on it.
  • However, =require and =require_tree doesn't load files which are already imported. Therefore use specific =requires for files where ordering is important, and let =require_tree . to do the dirty work.

It looks like we'll have at least a plugin to handle this situation, which might be migrated to sprockets eventually, but for the time being we don't have anything similar.

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@Tiaglo Scolari: this is the best solution I could find! Simple but effective. I have renamed ajax_loaded to state_pushed, but this is the only modification I could come up with :) (I support AJAX queries even if history state is not available)

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Well, if you store all three data (eg. hash, salt, and cost), you can update users' password on the fly to increase cost of older encrypted passwords... at successful login:

class User
  DEFAULT_COST = 15

  def self.authenticate(email, password)
    user = where(:email => email).first
    if user
      pw = BCrypt::Password.new(user.password_hash)
      if pw == password
        if pw.cost < DEFAULT_COST
          user.password = password
          user.save
        end
        user
      else
        nil
      end
    else
      nil
    end
  end
  ...
end