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Sindre Moen's Profile

GitHub User: sindrenm

Comments by Sindre Moen

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Hello John. Sorry for the late reply, didn't notice your question until now. If it's still a problem, make sure you're actually installing the gem on Heroku. By default, Heroku does not install gems from the assets group in your Gemfile, as they're considered only for development and test. So, if your gem is in the assets group, try moving it out of there and see if the problem persists.

Good luck. :-)

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I don't think it's as much of a convention as it is a convenience. There's no harm in appending :string when running the generator.

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I think you mean Twitter Bootstrap. And you are corrent, it does provide several mixins to use and variables to manipulate. :-)

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Great screencast! I've also been using Compass before and would love to see a screencast about this soon.

For those who have asked: Compass is quite a lot more extensive than Bourbon and offers more functionality (such as sticky footers and image spriting). However, I think Bourbon is much easier to get started with and use, and for those projects that doesn't need the largeness of Compass, I believe Bourbon might just be the right thing to use.

Also check out Twitter Bootstrap, which Ryan covered on a recent episode. While Bootstrap gives you a lot more than just mixins and variables for your SCSS files, they provide you with a number of these as well.

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See my answer to Matthew above. You're better off not using Sprockets to gather your SCSS files.

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Make sure you are not using Sprockets in your application stylesheet file. As Ryan mentions at the beginning of this episode, Sprockets will compile each of the SCSS files individually, and you will therefore not have access to the bourbon.css.scss in your SCSS files (unless explicitly imported). I see no reason to use Sprockets for your sCSS files – other than the (rather flawed, in my opinion) require-tree functionality, so it's generally better to rename the application.css file to application.css.scss and use SCSS @import instead. Watch the beginning of this screencast once more to see how Ryan does it.